Quinn Evans Architects renovated 60,000-square-feet within an existing historic urban high school building for 340 students in a new STEM middle school program - the first of its kind in the District of Columbia. The high-performance educational space earned a LEED-CI Platinum Rating from the US Green Building Council making it the first public school renovation in the District to earn a LEED rating of this level. 
 
Embedded within McKinley Technology Education Campus, the McKinley Middle School design reinforces the collaborative and project-based learning which are the core of the STEM program. Classrooms and laboratories for science and technology are equipped for multiple 21st century learning modes and are filled with natural light from the large windows of the original school building. Overhead distribution in the laboratories and flexible furnishings in the classroom spaces are adaptable to accommodate multiple styles of teaching in support of hands-on and project-based learning. Wide hallways that feature a strong graphic identity package are at the core of this exciting and engaging school environment. In addition, a unique professional development lab fosters collaboration, continuing learning, and experimentation for STEM educators. 
 
The primary sustainable highlights include a high performance HVAC system, enhanced acoustical design of learning environments, efficient plumbing and light fixtures, and utilization of surplus space within the existing 1920s school building. 81 points out of a possible 110 were awarded - see the USGBC LEED scorecard here. The project scored highest in the Water Efficiency category (achieving the maximum points possible (11) plus an additional point awarded as a Regional Priority Credit and Indoor Environmental Quality (achieving 14 of the 17 possible points). Innovation credits were awarded for exemplary performance - green power, a green cleaning policy, green building Education Program, shared use of the facilities for local organizations and educational programs, and low mercury lighting.