Quinn Evans has been involved with a series of extraordinary projects to preserve the invaluable legacy of African Americans whose experiences and achievements have enriched our country, often at a great personal sacrifice. Protecting these places enables immersive visitor education and engagement with the past, perpetuating the immeasurable impact these events have had on our continued quest for equality.

Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument

Charles Young (1864-1922) overcame inequality to become a leading national figure in the years after the Civil War. Not only was he the first African American national park superintendent, but he became the highest-ranking African American United States Army officer prior to World War I. His family’s house and farm, affectionately called Youngsholm, was a pleasant refuge from service as a commander of the Buffalo Soldiers and a military attaché throughout North America, Africa, and East Asia. His legacy endures as a point of pride for the local community, fostering numerous partnerships with the new national monument.

Uncovering a lost landscape presents a unique opportunity to interpret the Young family’s story and recapture the historic character of the homestead, farm, and fields. The planning and design project includes restoration and rehabilitation recommendations for interpretation of the 1922 homestead, compatible gathering spaces, wayside exhibits, parking, and the sustainable management of fields and woodlands. Landscape documentation and recommendations were carefully coordinated with historic architecture and archaeology. Youngsholm will serve as a nexus for understanding the role of the Buffalo Soldiers in American history and evoke the life of its influential leader.

Charles Young
Charles Young and his family at Youngsholm
Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument

Click here to visit the National Park Service webpage for more information on the Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument.